NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release: Thursday, February
26, 2015

MEDIA CONTACT: CHRC Executive Director Ericka
King-Betts, PhD at chrc@cincinnati-oh.gov
or by phone at 513.352.3237
CHRC Public Statement: City of
Cincinnati’s Economic Inclusion Recommendations
Cincinnati, OH – We at the Cincinnati Human Relations support
Mayor Cranley’s Economic Inclusion Advisor Council (EIAC) recommendations for a
“Greater Cincinnati for Economic Inclusion”. 
We support the 37 recommendations aimed at increasing the amount of city
contracts awarded to minority- and women-owned businesses contracting with the
City of Cincinnati, the 14 recommendations focused on changes to internal
policies and procedures at City Hall, and the 23 recommendations aimed at
helping the region became a catalyst for Economic Inclusion.
It
is our hope that these recommendations can be sustained over
time by putting an effective structure in place that promotes Economic
Inclusion, along with a set of metrics to gauge whether it is being effective
over time.
Since
1943, the Cincinnati Human Relations Commission has worked tirelessly to help
our community to overcome prejudice and discrimination, build mutual respect
and understanding, and to become more harmonious and cohesive. And, we support
Mayor Cranley’s efforts to create a more inclusive and welcoming Cincinnati.
About
the Cincinnati
Human Relations Commission
CHRC was established in November of
1943 as The Mayor’s Friendly Relations Committee. The goal was to appoint a
committee that represented various racial, industrial and religious groups to
make sure all groups felt a part of their communities and supported one another
in the city of Cincinnati.
As time passed the name was changed to CHRC and the mission grew to target a
much larger issue, discrimination. Thus, the agency’s mission is “to
help our community to overcome prejudice and discrimination, build mutual
respect and understanding, and to become more harmonious and cohesive.”
The Cincinnati Human Relations Commission is a non-profit
organization. For additional information on how you can support CHRC and its
programs, please contact Executive Director, Ericka King-Betts, PhD at
513-352-3237. 
###

February 26th, 2015

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CHRC was delighted to host Mrs. P. Jeane Goings for the final installment of the Local Legends, Black History Month lunch and learn series. Mrs. Goings gave a vivid account of her life including overcoming discrimination in the workplace, integrating Kennedy Heights, and making an impact through community service and board leadership. We are incredibly grateful for her energy and her insight, and thankful for all of those who made this series a success.

February 25th, 2015

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The Topic was the “Aftermath of Ferguson: Media Coverage and Race”. Opinions of the media coverage of this event and similar events, where race plays a significant role in how stories are covered in the mainstream media & how limited diversity in newsroom staffs affects coverage of major news events, like this one, that involve community and police conflict, particularly when race is an important factor in the story were shared. As part of the discussion, they reflected on how Cincinnati’s 2001 riots, which were fueled by the fatal shooting of 19-year-old Timothy Thomas by Cincinnati Police Officer Stephen Roach, were frequently referenced in the media coverage of the unrest in Ferguson. This panel discussion was part of the weekly Career Explorations in Journalism course, which is for mostly freshmen who are interested in studying journalism. 
Panelists included Bowdeya Tweh, reporter with The Cincinnati Enquirer and Cincinnati SPJ board member; Clyde Gray, former anchor with WCPO; Dr. Ericka King-Betts, executive director of the Cincinnati Human Relations Commission; and Melvin Grier, Cincinnati photojournalist.

February 25th, 2015

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You are invited to join the League of Women Voters of the Cincinnati Area and the Juneteenth Cincinnati in a discussion of the Criminal Justice System and African Americans, Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. at the Mt. Auburn Presbyterian Church. 
This year is the 150 anniversary of the adoption of the 13th Amendment to the Constitution intended to abolish slavery.  Community organizations throughout the City are learning about the history of criminalization and forced labor following the 13th amendment and discussing their impact on current events involving shootings by police and the mass incarceration of Black men.  We are encouraging people to watch the PBS documentary “Slavery by Another Name” prior to the March 4 meeting. It can be viewed for free on the PBS website at www.pbs.org/tpt/slavery-by-another-name/watch/.   “The New Jim Crow” by Michelle Alexander will also be considered in this discussion.
The March 4 meeting is an opportunity to discuss the issues raised by this history and how it impacts us to this day. It also will serve as a discussion leader briefing for seven small group LWV unit meetings in March.  The Cincinnati Human Relations Commission is joining us for the March 4 meeting and we invite other organizations and individuals to join us on Wednesday, March 4.
For more information, see the League of Women Voters website, www.lwvcincinnati.org
Douglas Blackmon, a Wall Street Journal reporter, published the book Slavery by Another Name in 2008. The book began as an article Blackmon wrote for The Wall Street Journal detailing the use of black forced labor by U.S. Steel Corporation in Birmingham, Alabama. Seeing the strong response to the article, he began research for a more comprehensive look at the topic. The resulting book was well received by critics and became a New York Times Best Seller. In 2009, it was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction, and in 2011, was adapted into a documentary film for PBS.

February 24th, 2015

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Join CHRC’s Community Outreach Advocates “Empowering the Community Workshop” this Saturday, February 28th, 10:00am – 2:00pm at the Hirsch Recreation Center, 3630 Reading Road.

February 24th, 2015

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In honor of
Black History Month, Councilmember Yvette Simpson and the Cincinnati Human
Relations Commission (CHRC) will feature Mrs. P. Jeane
Goings
, Wednesday, February 25, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM, at Cincinnati City Hall, 801 Plum Street, Room 115, First Floor.
Learn about the barriers this trailblazer has broken and discuss the work that
remains to be done.  The community is invited to bring your lunch and
converse with this Black living legend.
This event is FREE and OPEN
to the public.

Immediately
following the discussion, Mrs. Goings will be presented with a Resolution from
the City in City Council Chambers. Join us for this remarkable occasion.
About Mrs. P. Jeane Goings

P. Jeane Goings was born in Louisville,
Kentucky, the daughter of a former Kentucky state
representative and a teacher. She moved to Cincinnati
in 1954 after earning a master’s degree in social work from the University of Pennsylvania and fell in love with and
married William Goings, a local pharmacist and World War II Army veteran. Ms.
Goings and her husband moved to Kennedy
Heights more than 50
years ago. They were among the first African-American families to venture into
the neighborhood that actively courted integration amid the civil rights
struggles of the late 1950s. They raised three children, all of whom are
successful adults who followed the family’s lead of service to others, religion
and education.

Ms. Goings encountered racism on her first job in Cincinnati in the 1950s when she discovered
that the agency for which she worked was using inequitable pay scales that were
based on both the race and gender of its employees. She fought to bring about
change. After this job, she served as Director of Social Services for
Children’s Home, Inc. of Cincinnati
for more than 20 years and was instrumental in placing over 1,000 children in
caring homes with an eye toward bridging racial constraints.

During the 1960’s, P. Jeane Goings, along with her husband, was instrumental in
founding the Kennedy Heights Community Council, which is actively involved in
Block Watch and zoning issues, advocating for good neighborhood schools, and
bridging racial differences. She was among the core group who founded the Kennedy Heights Arts
Center more than 10 years
ago. This group raised $40,000 needed to match a $50,000 grant from the City of
Cincinnati to
secure the old Kennedy mansion on Montgomery
Road and to ensure development of a future arts
center that continues to thrive to this day. 

Ms.
Goings, the only President of the YWCA Board of Directors to serve three terms,
became involved in 1977 through her participation in the committee that
established the first battered women shelter in our community and was
instrumental in helping to launch and complete the YWCA’s capital campaign that
made a new and expanded shelter for battered women and the renovation of the
YWCA’s historic downtown headquarters possible.

Ms. Goings lives by the motto “To those whom much is given, much is expected.”
For nearly 55 years, she has tirelessly given her time to dozens of Cincinnati
boards and community organizations, including The Wellness Community of Greater
Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, YWCA, League of Women Voters, NAACP, Charter
Party, Mental Health Northwest, Interfaith Hospitality Network, Maple Knoll
Village, Cincinnati Links, Hamilton County Children’s Service Commission, and
the Caring Place, a Kennedy Heights church coalition helping people who need
food, clothing, furniture, rent or utility assistance.

She has received numerous awards for her commitment to service, including the
YWCA Racial Justice Award, the Urban League’s Glorifying the Lions Award, The
Wellness Community Award, the Kennedy Heights Arts Center’s Kennedy Award,
Cincinnati Enquirer “Woman of the Year” Award, the NAACP Black Family Award,
and the inclusion of her name on the National Wall of Tolerance, which is part
of the Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery, Alabama.

About the Cincinnati
Human Relations Commission
CHRC was
established in November of 1943 as The Mayor’s Friendly Relations Committee.
The goal was to appoint a committee that represented various racial, industrial
and religious groups to make sure all groups felt a part of their communities
and supported one another in the city of Cincinnati.
As time passed the name was changed
to CHRC and the mission grew to target a much larger issue, discrimination.
Thus, the agency’s mission is “to help our community to overcome
prejudice and discrimination, build mutual respect and understanding, and to
become more harmonious and cohesive.”
The Cincinnati Human Relations
Commission is a non-profit organization. For additional information on how you
can support CHRC and its programs, please contact Executive Director, Ericka
King-Betts, PhD at 513-352-3237.

February 23rd, 2015

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In honor of
Black History Month, Councilmember Yvette Simpson and the Cincinnati Human
Relations Commission (CHRC) will feature Mrs. P. Jeane
Goings
, Wednesday, February 25, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM, at Cincinnati City Hall, 801 Plum Street, Room 115, First Floor.
Learn about the barriers this trailblazer has broken and discuss the work that
remains to be done.  The community is invited to bring your lunch and
converse with this Black living legend.
This event is FREE and OPEN
to the public.

Immediately
following the discussion, Mrs. Goings will be presented with a Resolution from
the City in City Council Chambers. Join us for this remarkable occasion.
About Mrs. P. Jeane Goings

P. Jeane Goings was born in Louisville,
Kentucky, the daughter of a former Kentucky state
representative and a teacher. She moved to Cincinnati
in 1954 after earning a master’s degree in social work from the University of Pennsylvania and fell in love with and
married William Goings, a local pharmacist and World War II Army veteran. Ms.
Goings and her husband moved to Kennedy
Heights more than 50
years ago. They were among the first African-American families to venture into
the neighborhood that actively courted integration amid the civil rights
struggles of the late 1950s. They raised three children, all of whom are
successful adults who followed the family’s lead of service to others, religion
and education.

Ms. Goings encountered racism on her first job in Cincinnati in the 1950s when she discovered
that the agency for which she worked was using inequitable pay scales that were
based on both the race and gender of its employees. She fought to bring about
change. After this job, she served as Director of Social Services for
Children’s Home, Inc. of Cincinnati
for more than 20 years and was instrumental in placing over 1,000 children in
caring homes with an eye toward bridging racial constraints.

During the 1960’s, P. Jeane Goings, along with her husband, was instrumental in
founding the Kennedy Heights Community Council, which is actively involved in
Block Watch and zoning issues, advocating for good neighborhood schools, and
bridging racial differences. She was among the core group who founded the Kennedy Heights Arts
Center more than 10 years
ago. This group raised $40,000 needed to match a $50,000 grant from the City of
Cincinnati to
secure the old Kennedy mansion on Montgomery
Road and to ensure development of a future arts
center that continues to thrive to this day. 

Ms.
Goings, the only President of the YWCA Board of Directors to serve three terms,
became involved in 1977 through her participation in the committee that
established the first battered women shelter in our community and was
instrumental in helping to launch and complete the YWCA’s capital campaign that
made a new and expanded shelter for battered women and the renovation of the
YWCA’s historic downtown headquarters possible.

Ms. Goings lives by the motto “To those whom much is given, much is expected.”
For nearly 55 years, she has tirelessly given her time to dozens of Cincinnati
boards and community organizations, including The Wellness Community of Greater
Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, YWCA, League of Women Voters, NAACP, Charter
Party, Mental Health Northwest, Interfaith Hospitality Network, Maple Knoll
Village, Cincinnati Links, Hamilton County Children’s Service Commission, and
the Caring Place, a Kennedy Heights church coalition helping people who need
food, clothing, furniture, rent or utility assistance.

She has received numerous awards for her commitment to service, including the
YWCA Racial Justice Award, the Urban League’s Glorifying the Lions Award, The
Wellness Community Award, the Kennedy Heights Arts Center’s Kennedy Award,
Cincinnati Enquirer “Woman of the Year” Award, the NAACP Black Family Award,
and the inclusion of her name on the National Wall of Tolerance, which is part
of the Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery, Alabama.

About the Cincinnati
Human Relations Commission
CHRC was
established in November of 1943 as The Mayor’s Friendly Relations Committee.
The goal was to appoint a committee that represented various racial, industrial
and religious groups to make sure all groups felt a part of their communities
and supported one another in the city of Cincinnati.
As time passed the name was changed
to CHRC and the mission grew to target a much larger issue, discrimination.
Thus, the agency’s mission is “to help our community to overcome
prejudice and discrimination, build mutual respect and understanding, and to
become more harmonious and cohesive.”
The Cincinnati Human Relations
Commission is a non-profit organization. For additional information on how you
can support CHRC and its programs, please contact Executive Director, Ericka
King-Betts, PhD at 513-352-3237.

February 23rd, 2015

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Councilmember
Yvette Simpson and CHRC

Team up to honor local Black
Trailblazers

 Thursday, February 19 – Ms. Minette
Cooper

Cincinnati, Ohio-
In honor of Black History Month, Councilmember Yvette Simpson and the
Cincinnati Human Relations Commission (CHRC) will feature Ms. Minette Cooper,
Thursday, February 19, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM, at Cincinnati City Hall,
801 Plum Street,
Room 312, Third
Floor. Learn about the barriers this trailblazer has broken and discuss the
work that remains to be done.  The community is invited to bring your
lunch and converse with this Black living legend.
This event is FREE and OPEN to the public.
Immediately following the discussion, Ms. Cooper will be presented
with a Proclamation from the City in City Council Chambers. Join us for this
remarkable occasion.
About Ms.
Minette Cooper
Ms. Minette Cooper was born in Atlanta, GA.
She holds a bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education from Howard University.
August 2008, she received her Masters of Education at Xavier University.
 Despite being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in her early 20’s, she
accepted life’s challenges and went on to become an educator, wife, mother and
dedicated public servant.  She served on Cincinnati City Council for eight
years and was Vice Mayor under Mayors Roxanne Qualls and Charlie Luken.
Although her legislative accomplishments and
contributions throughout her tenure were impressive, the one of which
she is most proud was her determination to have the city install cameras on all
police cars.  After researching the issue, she lobbied her colleagues and
after two unsuccessful votes in council, the third time she offered the motion
it passed and became law.  Recent national events illustrate the vision of
her initiative.  The community now has evidence of the encounters of citizens
with the police.
About the Cincinnati Human Relations Commission
CHRC was established in November of
1943 as The Mayor’s Friendly Relations Committee. The goal was to appoint a
committee that represented various racial, industrial and religious groups to
make sure all groups felt a part of their communities and supported one another
in the city of Cincinnati.
As time passed the name was changed to CHRC and the mission grew to target a
much larger issue, discrimination. Thus, the agency’s mission is
“to help our community to overcome prejudice and discrimination, build
mutual respect and understanding, and to become more harmonious and
cohesive.”

The Cincinnati Human Relations Commission is a
non-profit organization. For additional information on how you can support CHRC
and its programs, please contact Executive Director, Ericka King-Betts, PhD at
513-352-3237.

February 18th, 2015

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CHRC Community Outreach Advocates are sponsoring a hiring event, Friday, February 20th from 10AM to 1PM. This event will be held at I Dream Academy (2648 Stanton Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45206). See below for more details.

February 13th, 2015

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February 12th, 2015

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