On January 29, 2015
at Xavier University,
CHRC Youth Services worked with approximately fifty (50) youth as a co-
facilitator at Xavier
University’s Community
Building Institute (CBI) for the Youth Leadership and Civic Engagement Academy
(YLCEA).  The students were affiliated
with Aiken High
School and Hughes
STEM High
School. 
This forum was the second of a three part series for the 2014-2015
school year, which helps the youth identify their leadership styles and
strengths, and use them to make a positive difference in their communities.
In 2012, CBI
designed the YCLEA.  It offers high
school students the opportunity to put their learning into practice and see
themselves as community leaders.  CBI’s
youth leadership development strategies and curriculum focus on creating
engaged citizens- young people with the knowledge, skills, passion, and commitment
to making their communities (however they define them) better places to live,
work and grow. 

CHRC became a
partner of this initiative in 2013 with CBI and David
Weaver of ISEECONNECTIONS. 
If you are interested in involving your school, please call Trina
Jackson, Community Building Institute Program Director, at 513-745-3348 or Jaime Bryant, CHRC Youth Services Coordinator, at
513-352-3249.  

  

January 30th, 2015

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On January 29, 2015 at Xavier University, CHRC Youth Services is engaging youth as a co- facilitator of two workshops with Xavier University’s Community Building Institute (CBI) for the Youth Leadership and Civic Engagement Academy (YLCEA). There will be approximately sixty (60) high school students from Aiken High School and Hughes STEM High School. This forum will be the second of a three part series for the 2014-2015 school year, which helps the youth identify their leadership styles and strengths, and use them to make a positive difference in their communities.
In 2012, CBI designed the YCLEA. It offers high school students the opportunity to put their learning into practice and see themselves as community leaders. CBI’s youth leadership development strategies and curriculum focus on creating engaged citizens- young people with the knowledge, skills, passion, and commitment to making their communities (however they define them) better places to live, work and grow. 
CHRC became a partner of this initiative with CBI and David Weaver of ISEECONNECTIONS. If you are interested in involving your school, please call Trina Jackson, Community Building Institute Program Director, at 513-745-3348 or Jaime Bryant, CHRC Youth Services Coordinator, at 513-352-3249.
     

January 26th, 2015

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The “Bridging Cultures Through Art Talk” will take place Friday, February 27, 2015, 11am-12NOON, Room 115 at Cincinnati City Hall. The featured artist cartoonist, Carol Tyler, will give an overview of how the social fabric of Cincinnati informs her work, and will take questions about using art as a tool to unify.

January 22nd, 2015

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January 22nd, 2015

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Cincinnati Human Relations Commission (CHRC) has teamed up with the Office of Councilmember Yvette Simpson to explore the stories of local Black history makers. Join us for our series of lunch and learns as we examine the past of civil rights and in our city and discuss what the future still holds.  Series will meet every Wednesday in February, 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM in Cincinnati City Hall, Room 115. 

January 22nd, 2015

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Come join us TOMORROW, Wednesday, January 21, “Job
Fair”, 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM at the Madisonville Recreation Center. Sponsored
by CHRC’s Community Outreach Advocates and SMX Recruiting. Any questions, call us.

January 20th, 2015

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Come join us TOMORROW, Wednesday, January 21, “Job
Fair”, 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM at the Madisonville Recreation Center. Sponsored
by CHRC’s Community Outreach Advocates and SMX Recruiting. Any questions, call us.

January 20th, 2015

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Congratulations to Jaime Bryant, CHRC Youth Services Coordinator, who has
recently been selected as a member of Mayor John Cranley’s Young Professional
Kitchen Cabinet (YPKC).  
Mayor Cranley’s Young Professionals Kitchen
Cabinet is an action based co-learning community that inspires young
professionals, gives them a behind-the-scenes view at how their city government
works, and gives them a platform to engage in public policy.  The organization will connect young
professionals with Cincinnati’s
elected officials and give them the tools to engage communities and
constituencies to effect change.  Now is
the time to revitalize the YPKC with Mayor Cranley to fill a gap in Cincinnati that connects
and engages young professionals in public policy and civic engagement.

January 14th, 2015

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Regarding Leelah Alcorn Vigil
held on Saturday, January 10, 2015
Written by Michael W Hawkins, CHRC Board Vice President
Many
of us were recently made aware of the suicide of 17 year old Leelah Alcorn, a
transgender teen, on December 28, 2014.  In her suicide note, she
expressed hope that her death would create a dialogue about discrimination,
abuse and the lack of support for transgender people, and to fix society. 
See #FixSociety.
I
recently was appointed by the Mayor to The Cincinnati Human Relations
Commission and am its Vice Chair.  One of my fellow Commissioners, who is
transgender, invited me to attend this vigil for Leelah.  I attended it
and was profoundly impacted and educated about this important issue to the
point of sharing it with others who, like me, have likely not attended an event
with the LGBT and transgender community and their allies.
To do
justice to this vigil and the important message, I want to do my best to share
this experience and, encourage dialogue about it or follow up with some of the
resources and help to make a difference.
The
program opened with the song “Iris” (Goo Goo Dolls) performed by the Diverse
City Youth Chorus.  Two key phrases in the song are “I don’t think they’d
understand” and “I just want you to know who I am.”  This song set the
theme of the voices of the transgender community that they just want to be
accepted for who they are, loved, supported and accepted by family, friends and
community, and shown respect and compassion.  These messages were
presented by older adults, young adults and teenagers who all publicly
identified as transgender and, especially the teens who shared their stories of
support, lack of support, depression, suicidal thoughts (41% of transgenders
consider suicide) and the challenges and consequences for them.
As to
the teens, from ages 12 to 18, they spoke of their process of identifying as
transgender, challenges communicating, needing support from family, abandoned
by some parents, inability to be accepted at school, having to be home
schooled, suicidal thoughts and killing themselves slowly with self harm,
eating disorders, depression, having a broken heart and feeling alone and that
no one loves me.  To a person, these feelings consistently arose from not
being accepted and understood for who they are.  They uniformly commented
they just want to live lives with happiness and purpose.  Not only did
this raw exposure by them about their broken hearts impact the hundreds in the
audience, but it was heartbreaking to hear their pain mainly because society
has not been accepting of them.
There
were a few teens who have had a more positive experience dealing with these
challenges and it was primarily centered around family and friends who are
supportive and give them unconditional love.  The mother of Tiffany
Edwards, a transgender young woman killed earlier in the year, spoke to the
audience.  It is believed that her daughter was killed because she was
transgender.  She spoke about the challenges as a mother when your child
is not accepted by family, friends, and school mates, and her daughter’s death
because people would not accept that “he” was a “she.”
The
program concluded with affirmation by all in attendance to the teens that we
love you as fellow human beings, we support you for who you are and we will be
a voice for you and transgender teens to make sure there is help and acceptance
in society.  For help, Children’s Medical Center
has a transgender clinic for youth and currently have 115 teens in its
program.  Heartland Trans Wellness Group at www.transwellness.org
provides access to assistance and resources for the transgender.
The
closing song was “We Could be Heroes” by David Bowie.  The message before
the song was we can all be heroes for those disenfranchised by our society. 
We need to use this tragedy of Leelah’s death as a teaching moment for
ourselves, our family, children and friends.  We were challenged to
recognize we all have a voice and to exercise it by speaking up and creating a
community of respect and inclusion for all, including the transgender community.

January 13th, 2015

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CHRC is acknowledged in the press release and there is significant mention of CHRC’s outputs/impact in the final report.


http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2015/01/13/cincinnati-crime-hits-year-low/21688521/

January 13th, 2015

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